The Destashification Mystery Project Revealed with Tutorial

It will probably be used more than any other project I ever made.

Destashification Mystery Project closed

Destashification Mystery Project closed

It is small, fits in a purse or backpack, and when closed, the contents cannot be identified.

It is the Destashification Mystery Project and takes less than an hour to make with scraps from The Stash!

I tried to split the page because I realize that even today, this subject can be uncomfortable for some.

FHPW with contents visible

FHPW with contents visible

As the comments noted, (thanks for commenting!) The Destashification Mystery Project is a Feminine Hygiene Product Wallet (or FHPW).

FHPW - contents discretely hidden

FHPW - contents discretely hidden

I am sure I am not the only woman that has spent time rummaging through the bottom of my purse only to find a Feminine Hygiene Product that was no longer hygienic.

My DD in high school would “just die” of embarrassment if a Feminine Hygiene Product fell out of her backpack or locker at school or at sports. I engineered this very discrete fabric wallet in hopes it would prevent that horrifying experience from happening to her.

Tutorial:

  1. Three fabric rectangles showing dimensions

    Three fabric rectangles showing dimensions

    Cut three fabric rectangles.  One 11″ by 12″ and two that are 9″ by 11″.  They can all be of different fabrics or be of the same fabric.  The two smaller will be the cover and upper inside fabric.  The large rectangle will form the “pockets”.

  2. Rectangles after ironing

    Rectangles after ironing

    Fold all three in half lengthwise and iron.  The larger rectangle will remain folded to form the pockets.  The smaller rectangles should be opened.  The folded line represents the center line and will used as a reference.

  3. Step 3 showing sewing lines

    Step 3 showing sewing lines

    Place the right edge of the folded fabric along the right edge of the inside cover fabric.  Sew one seam approximately 1/4″ from the right edge and another seam along the center fold of the inside cover.  You have just created the pad pocket!

  4. Step 4: Fold Line

    Step 4: Fold Line

    Measure over 1.25″ from the center fold seam and mark that distance with a snip at the bottom.  Fold the pocket fabric over onto itself along that line and iron.

  5. Step 5 Sewing Line

    Step 5 Sewing Line

    Making sure that the inside cover fabric is out of the way, and using a W I D E stitch (6 – 7 stitches per inch), sew approximately 3/8″ from the fold.  You are creating a pleat to add depth to the narrow pocket.

  6. Step 6:  using skewer to press pleat evenly

    Step 6: using skewer to press pleat evenly

    Press seam so that pleat extends evenly on both sides of seam.  With steam and a cotton setting, this became a bit too hot to handle, so I used a skewer to iron the pleat evenly.

  7. Step 7: Measure and create a second pleat

    Step 7: Measure and create a second pleat

    Two complete pleats - showing the back side

    Two complete pleats - showing the back side

    Measure over 1.5″ from the pleat seam and create another pleat.

  8. Step 8: Lay pocket fabric flat on inside cover and sew along yellow line

    Step 8: Lay pocket fabric flat on inside cover and sew along yellow line

    Open pleats and sew along fold line

    Open pleats and sew along fold line

    Lay pocket fabric with pleats flat on inside cover fabric.  Pin and sew along left edge and bottom.  Pull out the threads used to sew the pleats closed.  As they were stitched with large stitches, they should come out easily.  Open the pleats and sew along the fold line through the inside cover, stop approximately 1″ from bottom.  This forms the long narrow pockets.  Put this section aside for now.

  9. Step 9:  Pocket fabric trimmed

    Step 9: Pocket fabric trimmed

    Cut excess pocket fabric even with left edge of inside cover fabric.

  10. Step 10:  Mark interfacing as shown

    Step 10: Mark interfacing as shown

    Cut interfacing (yes, interfacing – fusible medium weight) to size of outside cover.  Iron to the backside (wrongside) of the cover fabric.  Using a non-gel, non-permanent marker pen, mark the interfacing lightly in the locations shown in the Step 10 photo.  The two red lines are 1″ from the black dots.

  11. Step 11:  Hair Elastic near Pin

    Step 11: Hair Elastic near Pin

    Hair Elastic Stitched Down

    Hair Elastic Stitched Down

    Place a pin through the dot 3″ from the bottom (it should be along the center fold line from Step 2.  Hold a hair elastic (they come in a variety of colors) and stitch it down.  I used a tight wide Zig-Zag because my 50+ year old Singer Machine has that option.  If your machine does not, hand stitch it securely.

  12. Step 12:  Ready to pin and stitch

    Step 12: Ready to pin and stitch

    Lay the inside cover/pocket piece flat, pocket side up.  Place the outside cover, elastic side down, on top of it.  Pin along edges.  Stitch from the right hand red line to the uppermost right hand black dot, turn and stitch to the second right hand black dot, using a 1/2″ seam allowance, stitch to the lower right corner, the lower left corner, then to the lower left hand dot, the upper left hand dot and stop at the left hand red line.  Your seam basically connected the dots!

  13. Steps 12 and 13:  Sew seams and trim.

    Steps 12 and 13: Sew seams and trim.

    Trim all edges – except between the red line – to 1/4″.  Clip corners to 1/8″.

  14. Step 14:  Right side out

    Step 14: Right side out

    Reach into the opening at the top and pull the wallet right side out.  It will look more like a sack than a wallet.

  15. Step 15:  Ironed Flat

    Step 15: Ironed Flat

    Using a strong needle, pull at the seams while ironing to form a more presentable project.

  16. Step 16:  One last seam

    Step 16: One last seam

    One more seam – to hold everything together nicely.  Sew through the inside and outside covers approximately 1/4″ above top of pockets.  The Step 16 picture is upside down so that the stitching can be seen.

  17. The Destashfication FHPW completed!

    The Destashfication FHPW completed!

    Hand stitch (or machine stitch) the opening along the top closed and your FHPW is complete and ready to discretely maintain your necessary items.

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